For Red Abalone, Resisting Ocean Acidification Starts With Mom

Red Abalone
A red abalone attaches itself to the hand of project scientist Daniel Swezey in 2017 during experiments at the UC Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory. (Joe Proudman/UC Davis)

Study Identifies Traits of Climate-Resilient Red Abalone, With Implications for Farmed Abalone

Red abalone mothers from California’s North Coast give their offspring an energy boost when they’re born that helps them better withstand ocean acidification compared to their captive, farmed counterparts, according to a study from the Bodega Marine Laboratory at the University of California, Davis.

The study, published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, compared the effects of ocean acidification on wild and farmed red abalone to identify traits that commercial growers and conservation managers could use to help sustainably produce California’s declining abalone species into the future. Such information could help these groups address accelerating negative climate change impacts facing the abalone aquaculture sector.

Study author Dan Swezey, project scientist at the UC Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory, is a Population Biology alumni.  Read the full article here.